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Saturday, October 12, 2019

Who will win the #BattleAtGoatHill for control of the #DemocraticPartyPlantation in #SweetHomeAlabama?

Cue in Back to life back to reality.  



#SweetHomeAlabama made national news for all the right (no pun intended) reasons yesterday with the election of Steven Reed as the first African American  Mayor of Montgomery, AL.  Yes, Black and White, young and old, rich and poor Alabamians were rejoicing together with HOPE for Change we thought we could believe in humming We Shall Overcome then BOOM!  The DNC enabled by the white male-dominated media dropped a bomb on the celebration.


Let's recap:

This whole Civil War started when the SDEC Minority Caucus foiled Senator Doug Jones's attempt to take the Alabama Democratic Party back to before.

The DNC is on the side of the Minority b-but it's not racial.

Stay tuned.


Wednesday, October 9, 2019

"This night is not the end this night is just the beginning" ~Montgomery Mayor Steven Reed shows us how to win elections in #SweetHomeAlabama


The votes have been counted and ALL the people have spoken in Montgomery, Alabama.  
Alabama's capital, a city once known as the cradle of the Confederacy and later the birthplace of the civil rights movement, elected its first African American mayor Tuesday.
EYE would like to thank those in the white male-dominated Alabama media for their remarkable restraint and not enabling the racism by advertising Steven Reed is the son of the most hated Black Man in Alabama until after the election.
Reed was already the first black probate judge elected in Montgomery County and was one of the first to issue marriage licenses to gay couples in the state. His father, Joe Reed, is the longtime leader of the black caucus of the Alabama Democratic Party. Woods, who owns WCOV-TV, is the son of the late broadcasting executive Charles Woods, a perennial Alabama candidate for more than 30 years.
And then there is this: 
Reed also expands on the legacy of his father, Joe Reed, a local politician who has served as chairman of the Alabama Democratic Conference for decades. According to the Post, the elder Reed was elected to the Montgomery City Council In 1975—along with three other black elected officials, they were the first black politicians to hold office in Montgomery since Reconstruction.
Psst, DNC.  This is what happens when all the fingers on the hand work together.
Reed secured 67 percent of the vote in Tuesday’s runoff election, beating his opponent, local tv station owner David Woods by 16,000 votes, reports CNN.
So now comes the hard part.  Will the first African American Mayor of the Cradle of the Confederacy be allowed to actually govern or will he be another black/brown face that doesn't want to be a black voice?
The Washington Post reports Pressley said she's not interested in bringing "a chair to an old table."
“This is the time to shake that table. ... We don’t need any more brown faces that don’t want to be a brown voice,” Pressley reportedly said during the event. “We don’t need any more black faces that don’t want to be a black voice.”

Pressley's comments followed a tumultuous week of Democratic infighting, as establishment Democrats continue to clash with a new wave of elected progressives in the party.
 Time will tell the truth
Democrats have become consumed by nasty fights over racial politics, even as the 2020 White House contenders ramp up their outreach to the black and Latino voters who will play a critical role in determining the party’s presidential nominee.
Congratulations Mayor Reed.  EYE hope you can and will keep your winning coalition together and refrain from listening to those who advise you to throw your base under the bus. 

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

Updated: Get Your Fright On~ Halloween on the Alabama #DemocraticPartyPlantation

Myrtles Plantation At Night
Myrtles Plantation And the Ghost of One Slaves Bloody Revenge

It's getting downright spooky on the #DemocraticPlantation in #SweetHomeAlabama.
Alabama progressives should be leery of the Jones-Ragsdale tag team, veteran political activist Jill Simpson said on her Facebook page yesterday. Simpson noted that three individuals who helped unmask Fuller -- herself, attorney-blogger Donald Watkins, and yours truly -- came under attack from right-wing forces aligned with Jones and Ragsdale:
Let's recap:
A faction of the State Democratic Executive Committee (SDLC), led by U.S. Sen. Doug Jones (D-AL) met in Montgomery, AL  where the Jones faction approved new bylaws in a major step toward replacing current party leaders Nancy Worley and Joe Reed.
Seventy-eight of the approximately 250 SDEC committee members attended.
They adopted the new rules on a voice vote with no audible dissent. They voted to meet again on Nov. 2 to hold the new election for chair and vice chair.
Four representatives of the Democratic National Committee were at today’s meeting, including Harold Ickes, a member of the DNC’s Rules & Bylaws Committee. Ickes said his role was to monitor. He has been involved in the year-long dispute between the DNC and the state party.
The Alabama Republican Party is eager to unseat Jones to help the GOP hold on to control of the U.S. Senate and if Black Democrats don't vote for him that's exactly what will happen. 
Black voters made up 29 percent of the electorate in Alabama's special Senate election, according to exit polling. That percentage is slightly more than the percentage of Black voters in the state who turned out for Barack Obama in 2012. And a full 96 percent of Black voters in Alabama Tuesday supported Jones, including 98 percent of African-American women. "Black women led us to victory. Black women are the backbone of the Democratic party," Democratic National Committee chairman Tom Perez tweeted Wednesday morning, "and we can't take that for granted. Period."
And yet that's exactly what they are doing.   
But here is the Political Play of the Decade: For Democrats to have any realistic hopes of taking control of the U.S. Senate from Republicans they need to hold on to Jones seat. So control of the U.S. Senate is in the control of Alabama's Black block vote and we are damned if we vote for Doug Jones and damned if we don't.

Ain't that a dip?
Psst! Nancy Worley EYE know the tremendous pressure you are under and EYE appreciate your fighting spirit b-but...
Although you have been successful in the past at keeping the angry white males and the women who love them at bay I sense a force that is bigger, meaner, powerful, and more determined than ever before controlling this latest effort to take the ADP back to the Party of George Wallace.
Be afraid.....

RedEye tiptoeing away from the computer to go pray.

Saturday, October 5, 2019

Life on the #DemocraticPartyPlantation in #SweetHomeAlabama Episode 3

Nancy Worley and Joe Reed listen at a meeting of the Alabama Democratic Conference in Hoover, Ala. on Friday October 16, 2015. The party chair and vice-chair of minority affairs said in separate interviews Thursday they won't attend a called meeting of the State Democratic Executive Committee on Saturday.
Alabama Public Enemy #1 and #2





According to some (not to be confused with all) in the white-male dominated Alabama media, the two individuals pictured above are responsible for snatching brown children away from their parents and putting them in cages, all forms of racism, poverty, and sexism in #SweetHomeAlabama.  They are incompetent and the reason Democrats can't win elections.  They are the reason Alabama is #1 in college football and last in quality of life.  

So the war for control of the #DemocraticPartyPlantation continues appropriately in the Cradle of the Confederacy when the White Wing convenes a gathering to approve DNC mandated bylaws that will throw the Black Wing to the back of the bus and remove and replace the Party Overseerer I mean Leadership by any means necessary.


Stay tuned for another episode of Life on the #DemocraticPlantation in #SweetHomeAlabama


Thursday, October 3, 2019

Episode 2 of Life on the #DemocraticPlantation in #SweetHomeAlabama

Lawyers, start your billing.

Cue in  Deliverance

EYE can't figure out if the person(s) advising Senator Doug Jones is/are political masterminds,  Republican operatives, or both.




EYE have to give them(?) credit for being political mastermind(s)  they found a candidate black and white democrats could vote for, formed a winning coalition, and turned a red seat from the reddest of the red states blue.
Money and mobilization matter, campaigns matters, issues are important, and voters are listening. Doug Jones was assisted with a massive coordinated mobilization apparatus deployed on the ground in Alabama. A compilation of national grass-roots organization that partnered with local chapter groups like the NAACP. The turnout of African-American voters in Alabama cannot be overstated. 29 percent Black voter turnout, and Black women in particular, is credited with delivering the victory for Doug Jones.

The ground operation was well organized and well funded. The conventional norms still enlisted the help of the Party’s elite headliners including Barack Obama and Joe Biden who recorded robo-calls. Campaign events featuring Senator Cory Booker, Representative John Lewis, and athlete Charles Barkley were particularly important for drawing attention to what was at stake in this election.
Shortly after the election EYE started getting the feeling maybe we were punk'd because Doug Jones went from the lawyer who convicted the murderer of the Four Little Girls killed in The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, AL and the crusader for women's rights  to a so-called "moderate" who was going to represent ALL the people of Alabama.  Nod Nod Wink Wink


DOUG JONES: I think that this election shows that people across this country want to see people work together. When the people of Alabama elect a senator who runs on a platform of trying to find common ground and reaching across aisles, I think that's a message that both political parties should take heed.
SIEGEL: NPR's Debbie Elliott joins us from Montgomery. And Debbie, this is Jones' first elected position. What can you tell us about him?
DEBBIE ELLIOTT, BYLINE: Well, it's the first time he's run for public office, but he's no stranger to politics. He's been active in Democratic Party circles for some time. He's a former federal prosecutor appointed by President Bill Clinton. He's best known for reopening the 1963 Ku Klux Klan bombing of 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham where four black girls were killed. Here's Jones after he won a murder conviction in that case in 2001.
Fast forward to the escalating Civil War being waged within #DemocraticPlantation in #SweetHomeAlabama.  The minority is determined to rule the majority by whatever means necessary.

No good deed goes unpunished on the #DemocraticPlantation in #SweetHomeAlabama.  
Black voters told me over and over that Tuesday’s turnout is not a fluke — and doesn’t have to be an aberration. The same coalition of voters that turned out in Alabama on Tuesday, they said, can turn out and swing elections across the country. Democrats in other states can nominate candidates who have been working in the communities for decades, like Jones, or candidates that are not afraid to advertise on billboards in black neighborhoods. The winning candidate elsewhere could also be someone who isn’t willing to moderate his or her progressive views, they said.
EYE regret Doug Jones listened to those who advised him to throw the people who bought him to the party bus off and under the bus.  Really EYE do. 
History to the contrary, too many white Democrats refuse to learn that Blacks can win elections. Less than a week after Black voters were hailed for having “saved America” through a record turnout in Alabama to defeat Roy Moore’s bid for the U.S. Senate in December, pundits were advising the Democratic Party that it should reward its Black supporters by shoving them to the back of the political bus yet again. Bill Scher’s Dec. 20 article in POLITICO was typical of this bad advice. He suggested that in 2018, Democrats should run candidates like Doug Jones, who won a narrow victory over Roy Moore but polled lower than Moore among white voters.
Stay tuned.